Watch My waste

 

Watch my Waste conducts research on opportunities to reduce food waste in commercial and residential environments. Food waste is a huge issue and it is imperative that we reduce food waste as:

At least 40% of food purchased by households ends up in the bin

  • Extensive resources including time, labour and money are required to grow food, this energy is wasted when food is not consumed.
  • Transportation emits greenhouse gases.
  • Wasted food is often not disposed of appropriately and ends in landfill rather than compost. Food waste in landfill emits methane gas, a major contributor to climate change.
  • Wasted food could have instead been diverted to those who live locally without food security

Watch my Waste has found that Australian’s waste 7,500,000 kgs of food every year, that’s nearly 1 kg per person every day, costing the average household up to $2000 a year.
Household food waste can be reduced through meal planning, shopping lists, appropriate portion sizes, composting in home or community compost bins, and donating edible and unused food to neighbours or community groups.

 

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Key assumptions for potential success of the Wangaratta Community Food Hub

Key assumptions for potential success of the Wangaratta Community Food Hub.

  • The Community Food Hub is founded on effective and broad-based partnerships and collaborations, especially with the producer community; and leverages relationships with existing and well established institutions  and organisations, especially as regards access to infrastructure, logistics and funding.
  • It is able to establish and maintain, from its first year of operations onwards, a diversified range of income  streams, including: training and capacity building for local people and local producers; sales and logistics; warehousing and storage; a weekly people’s market; community kitchens and community lunches; food literacy programs and other forms of service provision

it’s operated by experienced and capable staff, supported by an experienced and capable Board, and has a strong emphasis on social entrepreneurship  in order to wok towards a substantial degree of financial self-sufficiency through self-generated revenue streams.

The findings of the Economic Impact Assessment, based on the REMPLAN modelling software, reveal that after 12 months of operation in the Community Food Hub 9 FTE jobs would be created and supported there would be a 1.2 million dollar increase in total output to the Rural City of Wangaratta economy and a $705,000 increased value added to the Rural City of Wangaratta economy. After 5 Years of operation of Community Food Hub 21 FTE would be created and supported, there would be a $3.152 million increase in total output to the Rural City of Wangaratta economy and a $1.794 million increase in value- added to the Rural City of Wangaratta economy.

A solid Financial Analysis based on modest assumptions sees the potential for business and financial strengths and viability of a food hub. It allows for a technological connector, such as the open food network, to facilitate the preliminary phases of coordinating food hub activities. The financial modelling reveals the core activities of a Wangaratta Community Food Hub, namely education and training, storage and warehousing, marketing and distribution, and the operation of a commercial kitchen, could generate a net revenue of $322,166 within 5 Years.Key assumptions for potential success of the Wangaratta Community Food Hub